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Philip Booth
7 June 2012
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There is some sense in the EU’s new plans to change the way in which banks are regulated. In particular, there are two major problems with the current system of regulation in the EU. Firstly...
Kristian Niemietz
6 June 2012
1 comment

-  Excuse me, Sir. Do you know the way to Holborn Station? -  I do. - Would you mind explaining it to me? - Not at all, if you are prepared to pay a fee of £1 in exchange for...
G. R. Steele
1 June 2012
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Martin Wolf recently committed the Financial Times to a $71.88 lunch-time interview with Paul Krugman. Whatever the quality of the meal, the interview was poor value. Three questions were covered:...
Kwasi Kwarteng
31 May 2012
4 comments

Britain currently has two emergency fiscal rules. There is a commitment, roughly speaking, to eliminate the structural deficit and to start shrinking net debt by 2015-6. These short term measures...
André Azevedo Alves
30 May 2012
1 comment

As odd as it may seem, Alexis Tsipras may well be the eurozone's best hope at the moment. As Greece heads towards new elections and a clear majority of the electorate is seemingly...
Philip Booth
29 May 2012
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In my last blog post I looked at the complexities of the UK tax system. Unfortunately, in order to make it remotely comprehensible, it was greatly simplified. The example taken was a relatively...
Philip Booth
28 May 2012
2 comments

If one were to set out to design a malfunctional tax and benefits system from scratch you would probably end up with what we have in the UK. As such, the Taxpayers’ Alliance new...
Carlo Stagnaro
25 May 2012
12 comments

The UK was the first European country to liberalise its electricity market. Will Britain now be the first European country to roll back the market and effectively renationalise the sector?...
Len Shackleton
24 May 2012
2 comments

Adrian Beecroft’s suggestions to lift some of the burden which employment regulation places on business deserve a fuller consideration than they appear to be getting from the government. The...
Philip Booth
24 May 2012
3 comments

Michael Sandel is in town at the moment to promote his book How Markets Crowd Out Morals. His article on the subject in the Boston Review is a clever piece that makes some interesting points. But...
Kristian Niemietz
23 May 2012
2 comments

The rate for travel insurance depends critically on where we go and what we do there. A hiking tour through the Amazon rainforest comes at a higher premium than a stay at a health spa at Lake...
Juan Ramón Rallo
22 May 2012
13 comments

It is not austerity but the threat of insolvency that is killing peripheral economies such as Spain. Since it has become clear that the European Union is not willing to completely mutualise risks...
Terry Arthur
21 May 2012
1 comment

It is heartening to know that the huge outcry concerning George Osborne’s proposal to reduce tax-relief on charitable giving has been followed by a few brave (and valid) counter-arguments....
Philip Booth
18 May 2012
1 comment

Working out who exactly owes what to whom in the eurozone is an increasingly difficult job. Money is pouring out of Greece and now, it would appear, Spain at a rapid rate. €700m apparently...
Philip Booth
16 May 2012
3 comments

  It might be thought that a succession of ‘tax cutting’ governments from 1979 and a government pledged to reduce inequality from 1997 would have led to a huge increase in the...
Stephen Michael MacLean
15 May 2012
3 comments

Surveying the political field following the local elections - where Labour made gains at the expense of Conservatives and Liberal Democrats  - Ed West confesses gloomily that ‘Being...
Kristian Niemietz
14 May 2012
6 comments

There are lots of good arguments against positive discrimination, be it through female quotas for company boards, quota systems in political institutions, affirmative action or otherwise. For a...
Philip Booth
11 May 2012
1 comment

In my last blog post, I looked at Archbishop Williams’ use of legal organ sales as an example of the degeneracy of the market economy. The fact that organ sales are not legal is a detail that...
Philip Booth
10 May 2012
3 comments

The Archbishop of Canterbury’s latest foray into the world of political economy does him even less credit than his previous attempts. He is an intelligent man, but capable of arguments...
Chris Snowdon
9 May 2012
5 comments

On 23 January 1912, representatives from twelve nations signed the International Opium Convention, which contracted them to ‘use their best endeavours to control, or to cause to be controlled...