Why not Tesco schools, Sir Terry?

At a recent conference, Tesco’s chief executive, Sir Terry Leahy, described standards in many state schools as “woefully low”. He criticised the current system for being too bureaucratic with too many agencies and bodies offering reams of instructions which distract teachers. The end result is that companies such as Tesco, the UK’s largest private employer, are often left to pick up the pieces. 

Sir Terry’s proposed solution is for the government to follow Tesco’s example by keeping instructions simple, structures flat and trusting the people on the ground. While such proposals from leading figures in the business community are obviously welcome, one wonders if on this rare occasion, Sir Terry has failed to grab the bull by both horns. 

Instead of attempting to import Tesco’s management philosophy into failing government schools, why not simply develop an entirely new model of a school and then expand it into a national and then a global chain of Tesco schools?

Well because government supply of “free” education tends in fact costs taxpayers a great deal of money reducing the resources that those taxpayers have. So they, the taxpayers a less able to buy other, preferred, goods and services. Such as a better education for their kids than the rubbish provided (at great cost) by the state. Consequently it’s a much tougher market than it would otherwise be.

I’d rather see Aldi and Lidl schools spring up. No gimmicks, no trinkets, high quality where it matters, cheap prices.

I’d rather see both. It’s called competition! Not just competition between schools that are the same doing things at different prices but schools that provide intrinsically different types of service.

OTOH, who would want to go into the school business? If there was a significant shift to private education, government would regulate it to death. I don’t think Tesco would enjoy education as much as they’ve enjoyed groceries.I suspect that a comparison between the different Virgin industries would be instructive, here.

Well because government supply of “free” education tends in fact costs taxpayers a great deal of money reducing the resources that those taxpayers have. So they, the taxpayers a less able to buy other, preferred, goods and services. Such as a better education for their kids than the rubbish provided (at great cost) by the state. Consequently it’s a much tougher market than it would otherwise be.

I’d rather see Aldi and Lidl schools spring up. No gimmicks, no trinkets, high quality where it matters, cheap prices.

I’d rather see both. It’s called competition! Not just competition between schools that are the same doing things at different prices but schools that provide intrinsically different types of service.

OTOH, who would want to go into the school business? If there was a significant shift to private education, government would regulate it to death. I don’t think Tesco would enjoy education as much as they’ve enjoyed groceries.I suspect that a comparison between the different Virgin industries would be instructive, here.

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