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Mark Littlewood
14 November 2010
1 comment

Iain Duncan Smith deserves credit for fully understanding the nature and scale of the welfare problem. But that’s the easy bit. Finding a solution with the right balance of carrot and stick...
Kristian Niemietz
12 November 2010
3 comments

Finally, with the release of the DWP White Paper, Iain Duncan Smith has let the cat out of the bag. In the future, jobseekers who reject a job offer, a short-term community work placement, or who...
Philip Booth
22 October 2010
2 comments

I must confess to being taken aback by the emphasis in popular comment about the impact of the CSR on the poor. I completely ignored the issue both in my comments on Jeff Randall’s show and in...
Peter King
4 October 2010
1 comment

Politics, unlike commentary, is the art of the possible. It is about getting things done and surviving in the process. One means of survival, however, is to try to do as little as possible, and we...
Daniel Knowles
14 September 2010
comments

Here at the IEA, it is something of a rule that if Hayek endorsed an idea then it probably wasn’t all bad. Bearing that in mind, I’d like to bring up a policy that isn’t often...
Kristian Niemietz
10 September 2010
comments

“The welfare state is now a vast, sprawling bureaucracy that can act to entrench, rather than solve, the problems of poverty and social exclusion.” The above quote does not come from a...
Peter King
21 August 2010
147 comments

There has been much discussion over the last week about the coalition government’s first 100 days. Some of this analysis has been useful (like that on this blog), whilst much of it has been...
Kristian Niemietz
25 June 2010
7 comments

From the moment Frank Field raised doubts about the validity of relative poverty measures, the outrage industry has been up in arms against him. The poverty enquiry which Field will conduct for the...
Kristian Niemietz
28 May 2010
7 comments

“The purpose of my life here is to improve the quality of life of the worst off in society.” Such ambitious rhetoric is not unusual for new incumbents at the Department for Work and...
Richard Wellings
19 May 2010
7 comments

Even Margaret Thatcher didn’t manage to dismantle Britain’s disastrous welfare system. Judging by the policy plans of the Lib-Con coalition, there is little reason to be optimistic that...
Kristian Niemietz
31 March 2010
1 comment

Unemployment figures may still look bleak, but there is one occupational group which can be thoroughly relaxed about their future employment prospects. If Ending child poverty: mapping the route to...
Patricia Morgan
5 February 2010
1 comment

Shadow Chancellor George Osborne leads the chorus of tut-tutting at means-tested child tax credits going to “better-off” families and seems to believe that we would save enough to bail...
Philip Booth
22 October 2009
comments

Reform have today launched a report calling for the end of middle class benefits to stave off increases in tax. Before querying that proposal, let me say first that I am glad that they have waded...
Philip Booth
6 October 2009
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The Conservatives are proposing to clamp down on incapacity benefit claimants in order to deal with the large numbers they say should be in work. This is a laudable aim, of course, but it is highly...
Kristian Niemietz
2 September 2009
4 comments

In A History of Modern Britain, Andrew Marr describes post-war Britain as a grim place in material terms. In 1950, only 4% of the adult population owned a television, and only 3% went on holidays...
Peter King
17 August 2009
4 comments

Gordon Brown recently signalled a shift in public policy away from performance targets and towards entitlements. He argued we should place access to health, education, housing and welfare on the...
Kristian Niemietz
5 August 2009
72 comments

Allister Heath once labelled Gordon Brown “a man who seems to love making simple things as complicated as possible”. A recent analysis of the benefit system by the Centre for Policy...
Richard Wellings
24 June 2009
2 comments

The last decade has been marked by a combination of low savings rates and high debt levels in both the USA and Britain. Indeed in 2005, the savings rate in the US reached zero, while 13 million...
Kristian Niemietz
27 May 2009
2 comments

Last week it was revealed that at least £7 billion has been paid out wrongly on tax credits over the last five years. Indeed, the tax credit scheme has been accompanied by administrative...
Terry Arthur
27 January 2009
2 comments

So Alan Milburn is back, allegedly to deal with ‘social mobility’, no less. Here we have yet another example of the government’s parallel universe (see here). Aided and abetted by...