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Gabriel Roth
14 June 2013
1 comment

Governments do not always support mobility. The Duke of Wellington objected to railways because they would "only encourage the lower classes to move about needlessly". United States...
Steve Davies
13 June 2013
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Liberalism as a political doctrine has had an enormous amount written about it over the years, mainly by philosophers. Surprisingly, historians, and particularly historians of thought, have had...
Christopher Snowdon
12 June 2013
1 comment

It is brave for a lobby group that has a long track record of using dodgy surveys, junk science and misleading press releases to release a report entitled Stick To The Facts, but that is what state...
Philip Booth
10 June 2013
3 comments

Whenever the left wish to make an argument for their favourite form of government intervention they always use – normally dressed up in more comprehensible language – some form of...
Kristian Niemietz
8 June 2013
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In his speech in east London yesterday, Ed Miliband hoped to reframe the debate by outlining a distinctively Labour approach to welfare policy. Distinctive perhaps but, from a policy perspective it...
Len Shackleton
7 June 2013
1 comment

It is depressing to see education minister Liz Truss’s proposals to relax childcare ratios – which would have allowed nursery staff look after more children – vetoed by Nick Clegg...
Kristian Niemietz
6 June 2013
2 comments

Apparently, the Labour Party is performing a U-turn on universal benefits, or at least on the Winter Fuel Payment. So far, the principle of universality has been seen as sacrosanct. Now, a removal...
Philip Booth
5 June 2013
3 comments

There is remarkably little economic commentary on the shadow economy. This is possibly because, by its nature, it is difficult to measure. Survey evidence tends to under-estimate the shadow...
Len Shackleton
4 June 2013
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It is reported this week that the Metropolitan Police is reviving a proposal, last aired (and rejected by the Labour government) in 2007, to allow the introduction of ethnic quotas in recruitment...
John Blundell
1 June 2013
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‘Behind every great man there is a great woman’ has to be close to being the most hackneyed expression in the English language, but in the case of Milton Friedman one has to give really...
David S. D'Amato
31 May 2013
2 comments

In the wake of the financial crisis, there are growing movements in the USA and the UK to abolish the countries’ central banks, the Federal Reserve System and the Bank of England. And while...
Patrick Minford
30 May 2013
3 comments

Mark Carney will arrive as the new governor of the Bank of England at a time when its policy is in disarray, but also when all the levers are in the Bank’s hands. He has a good chance...
Kristian Niemietz
29 May 2013
2 comments

After Baroness Thatcher’s death, when a renewed debate about her legacy had erupted, one particular publication format was suddenly all over the place: the ‘myth-buster’. Five...
Kristian Niemietz
28 May 2013
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Apart from George Osborne, nobody really seems to like the Help to Buy scheme, the programme under which the government acts as a guarantor for high loan-to-value mortgages. Among the latest to...
Christopher Snowdon
25 May 2013
5 comments

  The negative consequences of putting 'sin taxes' on products when demand is inelastic are well known. Almost invariably, they hurt the poor more than the rich. They encourage black...
Philip Booth
24 May 2013
10 comments

Earlier this week, I appeared on Radio 5 to talk about tax avoidance. The news hook was a speech by Ed Miliband on the supposed problems of Google’s low corporation tax payments. Of course,...
Philip Booth
23 May 2013
6 comments

The opening lines of the press conference presenting the IMF’s report on the UK economy did not bode well. The IMF’s deputy managing director David Lipton congratulated the government...
Kristian Niemietz
22 May 2013
2 comments

The protest placard he held up during Baroness Thatcher’s funeral procession made Dave Winslow a minor celebrity for a day. It showed a gravestone with the inscription ‘Rest of us in...
Philip Booth
20 May 2013
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A curious thing has been happening with regard to retirement patterns in developed countries: we have been living longer and retiring earlier. Between 1968 and 1999, employment amongst 60-64 year...
Gabriel H. Sahlgren
17 May 2013
5 comments

Since World War II, retirement has gone from a fringe to a mass phenomenon in western countries. Many people long for the day when they don’t have to toil away and instead enjoy uninterrupted...