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Toby Baxendale
29 April 2010
23 comments

Language was created spontaneously and needed no act of creation or sanction by the state – it is owned by each and every one of us. Money was also created this way, but today we have...
Holger Zemanek
1 April 2010
5 comments

“Borrow as much as you like – the ECB will bail you out” – that was arguably the implicit message of European Central Bank president Jean-Claude Trichet last week...
Steven Kates
23 February 2010
1 comment

The world is filled with irony and idiocies aplenty. For how many years was inflation targeting the very essence of economic policy when the threat of inflation was hardly anywhere to be seen. How...
Tom Papworth
2 December 2009
26 comments

The government’s economic recovery policy consisted of two tracks: one, a vastly expensive “fiscal stimulus“, involved ramping up spending at a time when tax revenues were falling...
Philipp Bagus and David Howden
30 November 2009
2 comments

While quantitative easing has received much press, qualitative easing has been neglected. Qualitative easing consists of policies that deteriorate the average quality of the assets that a...
David B. Smith
5 November 2009
6 comments

There seems to be near-lunatic policy inconsistency between the employment of the controversial and potentially dangerous policy of quantitative easing to boost broad money and credit, and the...
Philip Booth
25 September 2009
10 comments

If the next government, of whatever colour, insists on not taking the bold step of getting the government out of the production and management of the money supply – and political realism...
Charles K. Rowley
7 September 2009
12 comments

In our monograph, Economic Contractions in the United States: A Failure of Government, Nathanael Smith and I evaluate and categorically reject the hypothesis that a failure of laissez-faire...
Tom Papworth
6 August 2009
11 comments

The Bank of England’s decision to pump an additional £50 billion into the economy, over and above the £125 billion earlier this year, has been accompanied by the sound of...
Philip Booth
1 June 2009
2 comments

In every walk of life there are people who are greedy, selfish and sometimes those who downright cheat. Some MPs stretched their expenses to the limit, some people have cheated on social security...
Philip Booth
21 May 2009
2 comments

A couple of days ago the bogus Consumer Price Index registered a dip to an annual rise of 2.3%. The RPI fell further into negative territory. Perhaps the best measure of inflation, RPIX (the...
authors of Verdict on the Crash
12 May 2009
10 comments

In a statement published today in the Daily Telegraph and reproduced below, fourteen leading economists – authors of the comprehensive new IEA study, Verdict on the Crash - explain...
D. R. Myddelton
20 April 2009
2 comments

The British government, in common with many other governments, has embarked on a policy of “quantitative easing” [QE], also known as “printing money”. Can we trust them to...
Richard Wellings
2 April 2009
4 comments

Gordon Brown may be advocating a further fiscal stimulus as a means to promote economic recovery at today’s G20 meeting, but, certainly in Britain’s case, implementing such a policy...
Philip Booth
1 April 2009
12 comments

There is a strange post on Guido’s blog suggesting that even the IEA is advocating quantitative easing (QE). He says that he reached this conclusion after ringing round the “centre-...
Philip Booth
10 March 2009
4 comments

Quantitative easing has become such a buzzword that it has now become known by its initials – QE. On a number of occasions, I have discussed its merits in the current circumstances and then...
Gordon Pepper
5 March 2009
4 comments

The Bank of England is about to announce quantitative measures. The crucial thing to watch for is not the type of asset that the Bank will purchase, whether it will be private sector assets, for...
Richard Wellings
13 February 2009
8 comments

From a monetarist perspective, a strong case can be made in support of the Bank of England’s decision to engage in quantitative easing. A severe deflationary shock would cause big problems for...
John Greenwood
7 January 2009
comments

Alan Walters was an inspiring teacher with a broad interest in a variety of economic problems. He was especially interested in applying theoretical ideas to practical problems. I first met him in...
Philip Booth
8 December 2008
4 comments

Deflation means that the pound in your pocket is worth more each year. In an earlier age, deflation was regarded as benign at worst. For a couple of hundred years before 1946, moderate deflation...