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Philip Booth
19 February 2013
3 comments

I do not agree with taxes on wealth as a matter of principle. In general, increases in wealth come from two sources. It is saved from income that has already been taxed, or it arises as a...
Martin Cassini
15 February 2013
4 comments

Between 2000 and 2008 the number of traffic light installations in the UK rose by over 30%, boosted by an additional 1800 sets imposed on London’s streets under Ken Livingstone. There are now...
Philip Booth
14 February 2013
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The government reached the position in 2009 where it could spend no more. In many respects the position was similar to that in which Britain found itself during the late 1970s. Government spending...
G. R. Steele
13 February 2013
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  Little more than three years ago, Ireland’s taxpayers were saddled with around 40 billion euros of debt, after their government had been pushed by the European Central Bank into...
Philip Booth
12 February 2013
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Those who study Pope Benedict, who announced his retirement yesterday, have been impressed by his humanity and by his understanding of human nature. Statements he has made on the economy,...
Philip Booth
11 February 2013
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The ‘problem’ of better off people having to sell their homes to go into a care home has been around for two decades. Arguably, the issue raised its head when the Conservative...
Christie Davies
8 February 2013
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  A review of The Servile Mind: How Democracy Erodes the Moral Life by Kenneth Minogue Kenneth Minogue has written a clear and incisive account and defence of western societies...
Philip Booth
7 February 2013
1 comment

  James Buchanan pointed out that the problem with much policy-related economics is that it assumes one type of human person in the market place (the imperfectible human being generally...
Richard Wellings
6 February 2013
3 comments

The British government is right to be examining ways of shielding taxpayers from the costs of bank failure. However, proposals to ring-fence the retail operations of banks, and indeed to give the...
Kristian Niemietz
4 February 2013
2 comments

Even in its current shackled and constrained form, modern capitalism still has a lot to show for it. One of the greatest developments of the last two decades has to be the extension of air travel...
Philip Booth
1 February 2013
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  Banks are embroiled in another “mis-selling” scandal, but we can be sure that customer behaviour won’t be affected. Few people will switch bank as a result. Regulation...
Christopher Snowdon
30 January 2013
7 comments

We are used to single issue campaigners flagging up costs to the health service as a justification for raising taxes and restricting liberties. This week the big figure is £6 billion - the...
Kristian Niemietz
28 January 2013
4 comments

When New Labour came to power, one in five children lived in a household with no adult in work, so it was not unreasonable that parental work levels became a priority for the new government. A key...
Christopher Snowdon
24 January 2013
9 comments

In The Guardian this week, Zoe Williams laments the charity sector’s failure to speak out against government policy. She attributes this supposed conspiracy of silence to the statutory...
Philip Booth
23 January 2013
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  An interesting comment was made recently by Andrew Lilico at a meeting of the IEA’s Shadow Monetary Policy Committee. He suggested that the Bank of England has given up inflation...
Richard Wellings
22 January 2013
13 comments

Taxpayer subsidies to the rail sector have reached astronomical levels. At £6 billion per year (including Crossrail), they have roughly trebled in real terms over the last twenty years. But...
John Meadowcroft
21 January 2013
4 comments

An important component of the argument of F. A. Hayek's The Road to Serfdom is that those people likely to derive utility from directing and ordering others will come to occupy the positions at...
Kristian Niemietz
18 January 2013
15 comments

Imagine there was a Food Tax which had the effect of raising food prices by, say, 17% on average. The tax revenue was collected centrally, and then disbursed to agricultural producers. That tax...
Christopher Snowdon
17 January 2013
6 comments

  A curious little idea was reported by the BBC and the Telegraph this week, when two academics from Bath University called for the UK’s tobacco industry to be ‘regulated like...
Philip Booth
16 January 2013
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Earlier this week, the government announced a new pension reform which would involve the creation of a flat-rate state pension at around the minimum level of income deemed necessary to support a...