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Kristian Niemietz
2 October 2012
1 comment

Inequality worries a lot of people. According to the British Social Attitudes Survey, nearly four out of five respondents think the gap between the top and the bottom is too large. 57% believe the...
Kristian Niemietz
27 September 2012
5 comments

You have probably seen this video here, where Paul Krugman explains why the threat of an alien invasion could be a good thing. It would lead to the kind of stimulus package he wants: politicians...
Philip Booth
25 September 2012
4 comments

  Last night’s BBC programme on F. A. Hayek was interesting and, like the Keynes programme, gave the subject a fair crack of the whip. It is not by way of criticism that I write this...
Philip Booth
19 September 2012
5 comments

  Monday night's BBC documentary Keynes in the Masters of Money series will be followed by two others on Hayek and Marx. The first programme was brilliantly presented by Stephanie...
Kristian Niemietz
13 September 2012
comments

  In 1997, I knew next to nothing about politics, and even less about British politics. But I remember the debates about the ‘Third Way’ quite vividly. For some, the Third Way...
Nima Sanandaji
28 August 2012
2 comments

  Sweden and other Nordic nations are often regarded as role models whose policies should be copied by others. The reason is simply that these countries are characterised by good social...
Tom Papworth
24 August 2012
1 comment

George Monbiot has set out his cartoonish manifesto on the Guardian website. He paints a picture of ‘what the world will look like after capitalism’, beginning with this very helpful...
Philip Booth
31 July 2012
4 comments

When I was at university, the vast majority of liberal-thinking people were in the Federation of Conservative Students – an organisation that was shut down by Norman Tebbit for being too...
Steven Horwitz
25 July 2012
1 comment

Many believe that the housing boom and Great Recession were the result of human greed and the supposed deregulation of financial markets, both of which thereby demonstrate the failure of free...
Forrest Caple
16 July 2012
comments

  Anna Schwartz, who was made an Honorary Fellow of the IEA in 1997, was born in New York City on 11 November 1915. She died on 21 June 2012 at the age of 96 in New York City, where she...
Stephen Michael MacLean
15 May 2012
3 comments

Surveying the political field following the local elections - where Labour made gains at the expense of Conservatives and Liberal Democrats  - Ed West confesses gloomily that ‘Being...
Eamonn Butler
3 May 2012
1 comment

It’s election time again in the UK, where the local elections – in particular the high-profile contest for Mayor of London – are a laboratory example of all the shortcomings of...
Sam Collins
2 May 2012
1 comment

House of Lords reform has become a hot button issue that risks widening divisions within the coalition. On one side we have the Liberal Democrats, who historically have considered it their raison d...
Philip Booth
13 April 2012
2 comments

  Last month, the IEA co-published Lost Causes by Deepak Lal. The book can be bought from the IEA here. It was interesting to see, in the wake of the 2012 budget, various think tanks and...
Stephen Michael MacLean
12 April 2012
3 comments

Britons attentive to political affairs in Canada will be aware of its latest political scandal: allegations abound of electioneering shenanigans involving annoying telephone calls in the late of...
Steve Davies
30 March 2012
7 comments

When I heard in 2009 that Elinor Ostrom had won the Nobel Prize for Economics I was delighted and thought it one of the best pieces of news that year, if not the best. My feelings were shared by...
Eamonn Butler
26 March 2012
8 comments

Politicians are always exhorting us to take more interest in our community, in the government of our country, and the ongoing debates about schools or hospitals or roads. But few of us do. Politics...
Patricia Morgan
16 March 2012
1 comment

  What’s in a name? A hopeless factual and logical muddle. Call something a ‘benefit’ and who is it for? The ‘needy’, of course. Anyone else getting it?...
Kristian Niemietz
14 March 2012
7 comments

  Suppose a government institution regularly orders its office stationery from a company which caters specifically to public sector clients. Suppose inquisitive journalists find out that...
Steven Kates
9 March 2012
2 comments

There was a passage in the Wall Street Journal’s Notable & Quotable column the other day from an essay written by John Stuart Mill in 1844, which I suppose was included...