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Philip Booth
29 November 2013
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In a recent conference held at the IEA, there was much discussion of the Great Recession. How can we interpret the recent recession and how can George Osborne’s Autumn Statement help us get out...
Philip Booth
28 November 2013
4 comments

In recent weeks, there has been much fuss created by a group of students – supported it would seem by the Guardian and by people such as Ha-Joon Chang – who are complaining about their...
Kristian Niemietz
27 November 2013
5 comments

When you watch or listen to a political debate programme, and you hear someone saying something like ‘I am not against all development, but…’ or ‘I don’t dispute the...
Christopher Snowdon
26 November 2013
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First, the good news. Poverty has been on the decline for several years. Since 2007, the proportion of the British population living below the poverty line has fallen from 19 per cent to 16 per cent...
Eamonn Butler
25 November 2013
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My new IEA monograph Foundations of a Free Society outlines – in simple language – the core principles by which free societies work. It was intended for people who definitely do not live...
Steve Davies
22 November 2013
2 comments

  The government’s ‘Help to Buy’ scheme, soon to enter its second phase, is one of the most misguided and short sighted initiatives ever. It may bring short term benefits to...
Kristian Niemietz
21 November 2013
1 comment

These are not great times to graduate from university. Against the backdrop of a declining graduate premium (the difference between the earnings of graduates and non-graduates), university fees have...
Philip Booth and Richard Wellings
19 November 2013
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If we look at the performance of high-tax Western countries – which includes, amongst others, every EU country, plus the US – it is grim. These are the countries which, despite their high...
John Burton
18 November 2013
2 comments

One of the so-called ‘Big Beasts’ of UK politics and government, Lord Heseltine - formerly cast as ‘Tarzan’ by much of the media - has recently swung (again!) through the tree...
Kristian Niemietz
15 November 2013
5 comments

  The term ‘heterodox economist’ has a great ring to it. It seems to announce a daring and original thinker. Here’s somebody who defies conventional wisdom, the term suggests,...
Kristian Niemietz
14 November 2013
11 comments

Poverty campaign groups in the UK are heavily fixated on increasing welfare transfers and expanding social services. To organisations like the Child Poverty Action Group and Oxfam, tackling poverty...
Philip Booth
13 November 2013
5 comments

In a recent poll, there was strong support for the renationalisation of both the railways and the energy industry. In both cases, renationalisation would be a strange step back into the dark ages of...
Philip Booth
12 November 2013
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Fr. Timothy Radcliffe gave the high-profile Romero Lecture last week in which he said many good, sensitive and important things about the poor. Not surprisingly, though, the lecture also made many...
Kristian Niemietz
11 November 2013
7 comments

  For as long as I can remember, the herbal schnapps Jägermeister has had a reputation for being an old man’s drink. The brand name would inevitably evoke images of a rustic...
Stephen Michael MacLean
8 November 2013
1 comment

Telegraph blogger Tom Chivers has no qualms that ‘the three “mainstream” parties... are all essentially the same.’ As he writes, ‘The mainstream parties have...
Kristian Niemietz
7 November 2013
2 comments

During the US presidential election campaign, Mitt Romney was frequently scorned for his awkward stance on Obamacare. He lambasted Obamacare rhetorically, but it was well known that as Governor of...
Kristian Niemietz
6 November 2013
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Council Tax has to be the most unpopular tax there is in the UK. That is not because of its level (it accounts for just 5 per cent of total tax revenue), nor because of what it is spent on...
Len Shackleton
5 November 2013
1 comment

It’s Living Wage week, and many are endorsing the principle of raising low pay, whether by boosting the minimum wage, or by forcing local authorities and pressuring other private employers to...
David S. D’Amato
4 November 2013
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The peculiarities of the United States’ recurrent debt ceiling disputes stem from the Great War, when Congress resolved to allow the Department of the Treasury to issue bonds up to a certain...
Kristian Niemietz
1 November 2013
5 comments

  The NHS’s internal system of handling patients’ complaints is broken, argues a new government report published by a commission headed by Labour MP Ann Clwyd. Patients who file a...