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Len Shackleton
5 November 2013
1 comment

It’s Living Wage week, and many are endorsing the principle of raising low pay, whether by boosting the minimum wage, or by forcing local authorities and pressuring other private employers to...
David S. D’Amato
4 November 2013
comments

The peculiarities of the United States’ recurrent debt ceiling disputes stem from the Great War, when Congress resolved to allow the Department of the Treasury to issue bonds up to a certain...
Kristian Niemietz
1 November 2013
5 comments

  The NHS’s internal system of handling patients’ complaints is broken, argues a new government report published by a commission headed by Labour MP Ann Clwyd. Patients who file a...
Philip Booth
31 October 2013
2 comments

Barely a day goes by without a government attack on the private sector. Yesterday saw the publication of a report proposing charge capping for pension funds. Management fees levied by pension...
Len Shackleton
30 October 2013
2 comments

The media and the twitterati have had their weekly fix of synthetic anger over the award of compensation to Sharon Shoesmith, the former Head of Haringey Children's Services, for unfair dismissal...
Anthony J. Evans
30 October 2013
1 comment

In a must-read article for City AM, Andrew Lilico has taken aim at the ‘cranks’ who claim that orthodox economics cannot account for the 2008 financial crisis. As usual, his analysis is...
Stephen Littlechild
29 October 2013
1 comment

Energy prices keep rising. Prime Ministers and energy ministers, past and present, all propose their own solutions, although there is little agreement on the cause of the problem. The latest proposal...
Philip Booth
28 October 2013
comments

The British energy industry has gone from nationalisation to privatisation and back to government control in the space of 25 years. Although the energy industry is nominally in private hands, we...
David Howden
25 October 2013
comments

  Five years ago some comic genius came up with the joke that defined the approaches to resolving the problems of two crisis stricken countries: ‘What’s the difference between...
John Burton
24 October 2013
5 comments

Mark Twain contended that there are three kinds of lies: 'lies, damned lies, and statistics'. These matters have become even more vexed since his sardonic remark in 1906. Whilst the (...
Carlo Stagnaro
23 October 2013
2 comments

The British government has just given the green light to the Hinkley Point C nuclear power station in Somerset. The £16 billion project will be undertaken by a consortium led by the French...
Gabriel Sahlgren
22 October 2013
comments

In a jab at Michael Gove, the Education Secretary, Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg is said to soon be requiring that all free schools and academies hire teachers with officially approved teacher...
Philip Booth
21 October 2013
1 comment

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg has spoken out about the use of non-“Qualified Teachers” in free schools. I am being somewhat careful with my punctuation and capitalisation to make it...
Razeen Sally
18 October 2013
1 comment

  Will Asian emerging markets follow Latin America and the Middle East into the middle-income trap? Having enjoyed fast catch-up growth, will they now get stuck, unable to graduate to higher...
Philip Booth
17 October 2013
3 comments

It is always pleasing to publish an IEA monograph and find that the subject is being talked about for months or years after publication. Very often, of course, the true measure of success is that the...
Gabriel H. Sahlgren
16 October 2013
1 comment

In a recent blog post, Sam Freedman, former advisor to Education Secretary Michael Gove, announced that he has changed his mind about the viability of for-profit schools. He no longer believes such...
Keith Boyfield
15 October 2013
comments

If you visit Equatorial Africa one of the first things you notice is the profusion of oil palm trees growing wild. The locals harvest the highly nutritious fruit for a variety of uses including the...
Christopher Snowdon
14 October 2013
5 comments

The poorest twenty per cent of households in Britain spend an average of £1,286 per year on ‘sin taxes’, including betting taxes, vehicle excise duty, air passenger duty, ‘...
Philip Booth
11 October 2013
1 comment

I am currently attending a conference on the future of financial regulation being held by the Irish central bank in Dublin. We are hearing from the regulators about the importance of global...
Roger Bate
10 October 2013
1 comment

Twenty years ago I established the Environment Unit at the IEA to present a free-market alternative to the general doom and gloom and socialist militancy of many greens. We pursued projects on the...

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