Blog

Search

Philip Booth
6 October 2009
comments

The Conservatives are proposing to clamp down on incapacity benefit claimants in order to deal with the large numbers they say should be in work. This is a laudable aim, of course, but it is highly...
Len Shackleton
5 October 2009
2 comments

The financial crisis has encouraged all sorts of ancient anti-capitalist ideas to re-emerge like long-buried monsters from the swamp in some 1950s horror movie.   The Observer’s Ruth...
D. R. Myddelton
1 October 2009
2 comments

Businesses are more regulated today than ever. But trends go on until they stop. With Arthur Seldon, I believe we should take more risks of under-regulation. The straw man of “perfect...
G. R. Steele
30 September 2009
22 comments

A comment from a Woman’s Own interview in 1987 is often repeated, but rarely in context:  ”There is no such thing as society”. Its relevance was made explicit with the...
Ruth Lea
29 September 2009
10 comments

The Prime Minister is, apparently, intending to introduce a “Fiscal Responsibility Act” to tackle Britain’s scandalously bad public sector finances. Well, I suppose, better late...
Kristian Niemietz
28 September 2009
24 comments

Germany’s federal election yesterday resulted in a stable majority for a "black-yellow" coalition of Conservatives (CDU) and Liberals (FDP). Is this the starting shot of a free-market reform...
Philip Booth
26 September 2009
4 comments

The UK government has told the Football Association that it does not like its performance. Apparently it is not doing enough to advance the women’s game and for youth development, amongst...
Philip Booth
25 September 2009
10 comments

If the next government, of whatever colour, insists on not taking the bold step of getting the government out of the production and management of the money supply – and political realism...
Richard Wellings
24 September 2009
comments

Earlier this month, President Sarkozy announced plans to introduce a carbon tax in France. The UK could follow suit. A widely applied new tax, justified on environmental grounds, could prove popular...
Len Shackleton
23 September 2009
comments

The papers and airwaves are full of Baroness Scotland’s difficulties over her Tongan housekeeper. I have no strong feelings about what her political fate should be, but I do think, as Oscar...
Steven Kates
21 September 2009
6 comments

What one does is typically built around what one believes. This is as true of economic policy as of anything else. If it is believed that Keynesian economics is valid, and that it provides sound...
Helen Evans
18 September 2009
22 comments

The latest figures reveal that 430 people were killed in drink-drive accidents in Britain in 2008. This is a worrying statistic that brings home the risks faced by road users, but it pales into...
Kristian Niemietz
17 September 2009
comments

What’s the easiest way for a government to push their country into the top ten in a worldwide ranking of economic freedom? Coupling unpopular reforms (such as spending cuts) with popular ones...
Peter King
16 September 2009
4 comments

The debate on the future of public spending is a developing one, with Gordon Brown finally being forced to use the “c” word. However, there is still no real attempt to state what and how...
Richard Wellings
15 September 2009
comments

●  Philip Booth argues we need less financial regulation if we want a less oligopolistic financial sector   ●  Patrick Basham examines the evidence on young smokers and tobacco...
Philip Booth
14 September 2009
18 comments

The Institute of Directors and the Taxpayers’ Alliance have just produced a report on cutting public spending by £50billion. The report makes excellent reading and is possibly the first...
Richard Wellings
10 September 2009
13 comments

From China to California, the current slump has been marked by enthusiasm for high-speed rail. Projects typically form part of some kind of “Keynesian” stimulus package. Here in Britain...
Kristian Niemietz
9 September 2009
10 comments

Professor Christoph Butterwegge, a political scientist and poverty researcher at the University of Cologne, seems to be angry with his fellow citizens. What is bothering him is that...
Len Shackleton
8 September 2009
6 comments

An interesting case is going through the courts at the moment. Its resolution could further expand Employment Tribunal jurisdiction at a time when almost 200,000 claims are being registered annually...
Charles K. Rowley
7 September 2009
12 comments

In our monograph, Economic Contractions in the United States: A Failure of Government, Nathanael Smith and I evaluate and categorically reject the hypothesis that a failure of laissez-faire...