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D. R. Myddelton
5 May 2009
12 comments

If there is too much central government, maybe we shouldn’t regard being a member of parliament as a full-time job. Especially since most of our laws these days seem to come from Brussels; and...
Richard Wellings
4 May 2009
comments

●  John Blundell writes about Margaret Thatcher’s revolution for The Washington Times   ●  Philip Booth argues that the UK’s finances cannot be restored by big tax...
Kristian Niemietz
1 May 2009
2 comments

Today is International Labour Day, a day to celebrate “the social achievements of the workers”. Or so they say. Unfortunately, in much of the Western world, 1 May is simply an...
Peter King
1 May 2009
14 comments

A fellow academic recently commented that the phrase “housing for the poor”, which was used in the title of an issue of Economic Affairs I edited in 2008, was, to quote, “...
Philip Booth
30 April 2009
2 comments

In the Financial Times earlier this week, Peter Mandelson wrote:   Sir, I was surprised by the unreconstructed tone of your editorial (”The umpire should not choose sides“, April 21...
J. R. Shackleton
29 April 2009
8 comments

Harriet Harman’s long-promised Equality Bill looks set to land employers with further regulatory burdens, while doing little to meet its ostensible objectives – themselves of debatable...
Kristian Niemietz
27 April 2009
6 comments

In the early 1990s, Nigel Lawson dubbed the NHS “the closest thing the English have to a religion”. Today, this religion has probably been replaced by a more disillusioned belief that...
Richard Wellings
25 April 2009
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●  Don Boudreaux explains what “Earth Day” means to him   ●  Keith Boyfield explores the issue of bank governance   ●  Allister Heath is dismayed by...
Philip Booth
23 April 2009
10 comments

Phillip Blond is director of the Progressive Conservatism project at Demos and it is suggested that his ideas are getting a lot of exposure within the Conservative Party. His thoughts are certainly...
IEA bloggers
21 April 2009
16 comments

As the sterile thinking of incumbent politicians will not be sufficiently radical to reverse the growth in the size of government over the coming years, we asked IEA bloggers how they thought the...
D. R. Myddelton
20 April 2009
2 comments

The British government, in common with many other governments, has embarked on a policy of “quantitative easing” [QE], also known as “printing money”. Can we trust them to...
Terry Arthur
17 April 2009
16 comments

In his recent article in The Spectator, David Cameron tells us that “the public must be given a core reason to vote not just against Labour but for the Conservative Party.” He goes on to...
Richard Wellings
15 April 2009
2 comments

The publication of a new edition of A Tiger by the Tail: The Keynesian Legacy of Inflation means that four books by Nobel laureate Friedrich von Hayek can now be downloaded free of charge in pdf...
J. R. Shackleton
14 April 2009
8 comments

You might think that the financial sector had received more than its fair share of obloquy in recent months, but last week saw an attack from yet another direction, with the publication of a...
John Blundell
11 April 2009
3 comments

The news that the Metropolitan Police is to order officers to stop walking the beat in pairs and to go solo is a huge step forward. For over a decade the IEA has been highlighting what works and...
Richard Wellings
9 April 2009
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●  Gary Becker has an antidote to federal activism   ●  Donald J. Boudreaux argues that stimulus plans destroy wealth   ●  Keith Boyfield responds to Adair Turner’...
Kristian Niemietz
8 April 2009
12 comments

I sometimes wonder whether anti-globalisation activists have some kind of automatic text generator, which works more or less like this: you enter an idea which you disapprove of, say “free...
D. R. Myddelton
7 April 2009
10 comments

Anatole Kaletsky [The Times, April 6] says the G20 countries are right to borrow and spend even more than they have done already. But he seems to be living in a dream world. First he says this...
Kristian Niemietz
6 April 2009
8 comments

It is not always necessary to contradict politicians; it is often better to wait until they contradict themselves. A case in point would seem to be Health Secretary Alan Johnson...
Richard Wellings
2 April 2009
4 comments

Gordon Brown may be advocating a further fiscal stimulus as a means to promote economic recovery at today’s G20 meeting, but, certainly in Britain’s case, implementing such a policy...