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Kristian Niemietz
8 January 2013
3 comments

Anyone who has ever read half a page in a Public Choice textbook will, if nothing else, at least have taken the following insight on board: if the benefits of a policy are tangible and concentrated...
Kristian Niemietz
12 August 2011
14 comments

Gerhart Hauptmann´s 1911 novel „Die Ratten“ (Engl. „The Rats“), set in a deprived borough of Berlin, was a powerful critique of a concept of morality that ignored the...
Kristian Niemietz
16 February 2011
comments

A programme for the liberation of the UK economy’s supply side must include an overhaul of the dysfunctional welfare system. The present system contains various poverty traps which create...
Kristian Niemietz
6 December 2010
3 comments

The appropriate context for the term “breeding” is surely documentary films about wildlife, not welfare policy debates. Moreover, it is clear that the “return on investment...
Mark Littlewood
14 November 2010
1 comment

Iain Duncan Smith deserves credit for fully understanding the nature and scale of the welfare problem. But that’s the easy bit. Finding a solution with the right balance of carrot and stick...
Peter King
11 November 2010
2 comments

Iain Duncan Smith has suggested that his proposals to introduce a Universal Credit to replace many of the current welfare benefits are the most important reforms to welfare provision for 70...
Kristian Niemietz
11 October 2010
5 comments

The DWP is getting serious about the plans to merge a host of existing benefits into a Universal Credit (UC) with a single taper rate. There are two main aims. One is to simplify the system to...
Philip Booth
7 October 2010
3 comments

The UK does not have particularly high economic inactivity rates. Large numbers of women tend to work and worklessness amongst those approaching state retirement age is not as high in the UK as in...
Peter King
13 September 2010
2 comments

Housing policy was one of the areas where the previous Conservative government achieved some major successes, particularly with the introduction of the Right to Buy in 1980 and the introduction of...
Peter King
21 August 2010
147 comments

There has been much discussion over the last week about the coalition government’s first 100 days. Some of this analysis has been useful (like that on this blog), whilst much of it has been...
Peter King
4 August 2010
3 comments

David Cameron has stated that his government will consider ending security of tenure for social-housing tenants. Those tenants who were in employment would be “encouraged” to rent...
Richard Wellings
12 June 2010
1 comment

●  Mark Littlewood discusses cutting public spending on BBC Newsnight (video).   ●  Philip Booth critiques the coalition’s plans on pensions.   ●  James...
Kristian Niemietz
11 June 2010
12 comments

Swinging the axe on benefits and tax credits is no longer taboo after the coalition’s announcements that these spending areas will be scrutinised towards the end of this year. It looks as...
Kristian Niemietz
28 May 2010
7 comments

“The purpose of my life here is to improve the quality of life of the worst off in society.” Such ambitious rhetoric is not unusual for new incumbents at the Department for Work and...
Richard Wellings
19 May 2010
7 comments

Even Margaret Thatcher didn’t manage to dismantle Britain’s disastrous welfare system. Judging by the policy plans of the Lib-Con coalition, there is little reason to be optimistic that...
Kristian Niemietz
31 March 2010
1 comment

Unemployment figures may still look bleak, but there is one occupational group which can be thoroughly relaxed about their future employment prospects. If Ending child poverty: mapping the route to...
Richard Wellings
27 February 2010
comments

" ●  Philip Booth criticises bishops for supporting counterproductive welfare policies ●  David Henderson argues Climategate is just the tip of the iceberg ●  Oliver Marc...
Patricia Morgan
5 February 2010
1 comment

Shadow Chancellor George Osborne leads the chorus of tut-tutting at means-tested child tax credits going to “better-off” families and seems to believe that we would save enough to bail...
Richard Wellings
16 November 2009
18 comments

Public spending dominates the economy of the North of England. In the North-East region, for example, it accounts for close to 70% of GDP. Many northern cities seemed to prosper in recent years. The...
Kristian Niemietz
2 September 2009
4 comments

In A History of Modern Britain, Andrew Marr describes post-war Britain as a grim place in material terms. In 1950, only 4% of the adult population owned a television, and only 3% went on holidays...