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Anders Ydstedt
20 January 2016
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In 2004 the Swedish inheritance tax and gift tax was abolished by a unanimous vote in the Riksdag. In a new book ”Ten years without the Swedish inheritance tax. Mourned by no one – missed...
Ryan Bourne
18 January 2016
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Words like “fairness” and “justice” are regularly thrown around with little thought to what they mean. Strangely, though, the politicians who use them seem to be unwilling to...
Ryan Bourne
12 January 2016
1 comment

Rumours abound that the government is secretly quite keen on imposing a new tax on sugary drinks, to attempt to combat obesity. There are strong arguments against such a proposal. These taxes hit the...
Christopher Snowdon
12 January 2016
2 comments

Stephen Bubb, chairman of the Association of Chief Executives of Voluntary Organisations (ACEVO), has written an article for the Telegraph opposing government proposals to extend the Freedom of...
Christopher Snowdon
1 December 2015
4 comments

A tax on sugar - and on sugary drinks in particular - has become a cornerstone of the campaign for tobacco-style regulation of the food supply. The arguments against such an intervention are now well...
Kristian Niemietz
27 November 2015
1 comment

This article was first published by The Independent.   One of the good ideas in yesterday’s Autumn Statement was the scrapping of a previously announced bad idea, namely the tax credit...
Ryan Bourne
26 November 2015
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There have been four budget or budget-like statements in less than a year now. That’s four opportunities for the Chancellor to engage in a big-bang of announcements to improve economic policy...
Ryan Bourne
24 November 2015
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For the third time in a year, tomorrow, George Osborne will take to the despatch box to deliver a budget or budget-like statement. We will be treated to a feast of announcements as the Treasury...
Ryan Bourne
17 November 2015
2 comments

Many people have taken to social media to ask why the terrorist massacres in Paris have been given so much Western media attention, while similar atrocities in Beirut received scant coverage. One...
Ryan Bourne
11 November 2015
1 comment

How large were cuts to government spending during the last parliament? The answer may surprise you. Overall real expenditure fell by just 2.9 per cent between 2010-11 and 2014-15. Later in the month...
Diego Zuluaga
5 November 2015
3 comments

Britons are all too aware of the problems of political and economic centralisation. Indeed, the trend for more and more legislative and regulatory power to move from London to Brussels is one of the...
Andrew Lilico
28 October 2015
4 comments

A classical conservative believes private property exists in a moral, not merely political sense.  We could truly own things even if we lived on a stateless desert island and my property is...
Philip Booth
26 October 2015
1 comment

The corporate tax system is currently under attack from the EU and the OECD. In principle, this is not a bad thing because the corporate tax system is flawed. However, the EU and the OECD do not wish...
Ryan Bourne
6 October 2015
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Having won a majority, and with Labour’s new leader polling worse than any in history, one might have expected a jubilant Conservative party conference. But scratch beneath the surface in...
Philip Booth
7 September 2015
2 comments

A tax haven levies certain taxes at a zero or very low rate and combines this with limited information flows to other countries’ tax authorities and a lack of transparency in law making. By the...
Christopher Snowdon
3 September 2015
14 comments

There is a persistent belief that drinkers are a burden on the British taxpayer. In the narrative of ‘Booze Britain’, Accident and Emergency departments do little else but patch up the...
Philip Booth
12 August 2015
3 comments

When the current government is not regulating prices by imposing floors, such as the minimum wage, it is regulating prices by imposing ceilings such as on consumer credit and pensions products. When...
Ryan Bourne
14 July 2015
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George Osborne’s desired message was clear. He claimed last week’s Budget was a new settlement for a “higher wage, lower tax, lower welfare country”. The Tory media duly...
Ryan Bourne
30 June 2015
23 comments

Nothing is certain in life but death and the annual claim that the poorest fifth of households pay the highest proportion of their incomes in taxes. Each year, when the ONS publishes its ‘...
Kristian Niemietz
14 May 2015
2 comments

The Economist, 11 April 2020 - Continued from part 1 (healthcare) - Up until 2016, the UK was one of the most centralised countries in the world. What was strange about this arrangement was that...