Global Greens, Global Governance

This classic publication exposes the efforts of the environmental movement to undermine individual freedom by promoting the growth of authoritarian and unaccountable global institutions.

Over the course of the past fifteen years, environmental organisations have become increasingly obsessed with 'global' environmental issues, such as climate change, ozone depletion and biodiversity loss. They claim that these issues affect everyone on the planet and necessitate global agreements.

In response to lobbying by these environmental organisations, governments around the world have signed up to many international treaties, committing their respective countries to limiting emissions of substances such as CFCs and carbon dioxide. Like other political agreements, the global treaties involved considerable 'horse-trading', with governments of developing countries only agreeing to sign up if the governments of developed countries would commit to transferring funds to them. Even so, developing country governments have resisted subsequent attempts of make them sign up to specific limits on emissions of carbon dioxide, and production of CFCs continues apace in China, India, Russia, and other developing countries.

As pressure grows for the development of binding restrictions on the production and emission of certain chemicals, nations are likely gradually to cede sovereignty to supranational organisations such as the United Nations, with policies ever more dominated by the few organisations (environmental, labour and others) who are accredited as Non Governmental Organisations with the UN. The evidence strongly suggests that the resultant global governance will be undemocratic and policies will be based on dogma not sound science.

1999, Environment Working Paper 4, ISBN 978 0 255 36472 0, 99pp
 

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